What is a fuse:

The fuse is also called a current fuse, which is defined by the IEC127 standard as a "fuse-link". It mainly acts as an overload protection. The fuse is correctly placed in the circuit. When the current abnormally rises to a certain height and heat, the fuse will cut off the current and protect the safe operation of the circuit.

The working principle of the fuse: When the circuit is faulty or abnormal, the current is continuously increased, and the increased current may damage some important devices or valuable devices in the circuit, and it may also burn the circuit or even cause a fire. If the fuse is correctly placed in the circuit, then the fuse will cut off the current through the fuse's fuse when the current abnormally rises to a certain height and heat, so as to protect the safe operation of the circuit.

Fuse classification:

First, according to the form of protection, can be divided into: over-current protection and over-temperature protection.

(1) The fuse used for overcurrent protection is the current fuse (also called limiting fuse). Over-current protection fuse is divided into one-time fuse and self-recovery, respectively called a one-time current fuse and recoverable current fuse. Overcurrent protection fuse,

According to the appearance of the shape can be divided into: tubular fuses, resistor fuses, micro fuses, chip fuses, resettable fuses, automotive fuses and so on.

(2) Fuses for over-temperature over-temperature protection are commonly referred to as "temperature fuses." The temperature fuse is divided into low-melting point alloy shape, temperature-sensitive trigger shape, and memory alloy shape, etc. (The temperature fuse is to protect against the high temperature of the heat-generating or easily-heating electric device.

For example: hair dryers, electric irons, rice cookers, electric furnaces, transformers, motors, etc.; it responds to the increase in temperature rise of electrical appliances and does not care about the operating current of the circuit. Its working principle is different from "current limiting fuse"). Thermal fuses can be classified into RH-type thermal fuses (block-type thermal fuses), RF-type thermal fuses (resistance-type thermal fuses), and RY-type thermal fuses (metal-type thermal fuses) depending on the shape of the appearance.

Tubular fuses and thermal fuses